Bijou Basou is on her way to becoming an MD and a PhD, and she’s ready to share some important knowledge about the Pap test and women’s health:

“As a future physician, I believe that health is a fundamental human right. I believe that everyone should have access to health care and screening measures that can catch diseases early should not only be available to those who can afford it.

Your health matters. Women’s health is not regularly talked about and proposed “changes” and cuts to women’s health services seems to be a constant risk. Everyone has the right to be regularly screened for preventable diseases and everyone has a right to health.”

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#ad As a future physician, I believe that health is a fundamental human right. I believe that everyone should have access to health care and screening measures that can catch diseases early should not only be available to those who can afford it. Therefore, I’m excited to partner with @protectthepap to take a little time to tell you about the importance of pap smears, and why you should follow the recommended testing protocols. What Is a Pap Smear? A Pap smear, also called a Pap test, is a procedure to test for cervical cancer in women. A Pap smear involves collecting cells from your cervix — the lower, narrow end of your uterus that's at the top of your vagina. Do Pap tests really help? Yes! Before Pap screenings, cervical cancer was the #1 killer cancer in women, now it’s #14. How Does It Test for Cervical Cancer? Your cells are sent to a lab to test for the presence of precancerous and cancerous processes in the cervix. Detecting cervical cancer early with a pap smear gives you a greater chance at a cure and could save your life. How often should I get it? It depends on your age and medical history. It’s recommended that if you are 21-29 you get a pap test every 3 years, if you are 30-65 you should get a pap test every 3 years and get co-testing done, every 5 years which is both tests together How much do Pap tests cost? Most insurance plans cover Pap and HPV tests with copay coinsurance or a deductible. If you don’t have insurance the CDC has a resource (search: NBCCEDP) that allows you to find free/low-cost screening providers near you Your health matters. Women’s health is not regularly talked about and proposed “changes” and cuts to women’s health services seems to be a constant risk. Everyone has the right to be regularly screened for preventable diseases and everyone has a right to health. #protecttthepap #PTP #womenshealth #medicalschool #secondlook #medschooladvice #womeninstem #ladyscientist #womeninscience #premed #futuredoc #futuredoctor #medicalstudent #medicalstudentlife #medstudent #research Check out @protectthepap and https://protectthepap.com/about/ to learn more! Paid for Protect the Pap

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