Access to the Pap during an IVF process test saved Sarah’s life, and continued access guarantees that she’ll be healthy and able to look after her family for a long time to come.

“Women’s health is a topic that isn’t talked about enough. Unfortunately, there are proposed changes to the guidelines that could eliminate the Pap test and leave women at high risk for undiagnosed disease. This topic hits me close to home.
My husband and I were scheduled to start our first round of IVF in April of 2018. I was sent for a routine Pap prior to our IVF cycle and was found to have cervical cancer. We were distraught for many reasons, having to postpone our IVF cycle and of course the dreaded “c” word. However, we were also very relieved we were able to catch this in the early stages thanks to the routine Pap. I now have to complete frequent, routine Pap tests to ensure cancer does not return. If the guidelines are changed, I won’t have access to the appropriate screening to ensure I stay healthy. In addition, all women will be vulnerable to undiagnosed disease. This can’t happen.

It’s imperative that we advocate for ourselves as women and the importance of continued access to cervical cancer screenings. Prior, to the introduction of cervical cancer screenings, this was the #1 cancer killer of women. Since, cervical cancer has now dropped to #14. Wow, this speaks volumes.

As women, we should have a voice in health guidelines that impact our bodies. No guideline should take away access to stay healthy for ourselves and our families.”

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Women's health is a topic that isn't talked about enough. Unfortunately, there are proposed changes to the guidelines that could eliminate the Pap test and leave women at high risk for undiagnosed disease. This topic hits me close to home. My husband and I were scheduled to start our first round of IVF in April of 2018. I was sent for a routine Pap prior to our IVF cycle and was found to have cervical cancer. We were distraught for many reasons, having to postpone our IVF cycle and of course the dreaded "c" word. However, we were also very relieved we were able to catch this in the early stages thanks to the routine Pap. I now have to complete frequent, routine Pap tests to ensure cancer does not return. If the guidelines are changed, I won't have access to the appropriate screening to ensure I stay healthy. In addition, all women will be vulnerable to undiagnosed disease. This can't happen. It's imperative that we advocate for ourselves as women and the importance of continued access to cervical cancer screenings. Prior, to the introduction of cervical cancer screenings, this was the #1 cancer killer of women. Since, cervical cancer has now dropped to #14. Wow, this speaks volumes. As women, we should have a voice in health guidelines that impact our bodies. No guideline should take away access to stay healthy for ourselves and our families. Check out @protectthePap or protectthepap.com to learn more! #sponsored Paid for by Protect the Pap

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